2014 Tour Homes

saturday

1. Myersville, MD (address available in booklet)
ABOUT THE HOME: This is a 3,300 square foot Net Zero Home, which means it produces as much energy than it uses. This home has a 10.5 kilowatt PV solar system with battery backup along with 4-(30 tube) solar thermal panels. With the energy efficiency upgrades they were able to reduce their energy consumption to Net Zero. Homeowners are currently Green Home Ambassadors for the Frederick County Green Home Challenge Program. They have their Power Saver, Green Leader and Renewable Star certification.

2. Middletown, MD (address available in booklet)
ABOUT THE HOME: We have one of the first ground-mounted solar arrays in Frederick County, with 22 panels made by the German company, Schuco. It’s a 3.96 kW system, purchased through Greenspring Energy, LLC out of Towson. Our home is a small mid-1800’s farmhouse with stone walls on the 1st story and log 2nd story. It needed a good deal of renovation and we tried to be environmentally aware and as eco-friendly as possible during the process.

3 . Middletown, MD (address available in booklet)
ABOUT THE HOME: All-electric home (c. 1900 log farmhouse). We’ve added an 8.86 kW solar PV array roof-mounted on an outbuilding. This was a Solarize Frederick project completed in 2013. Sustainable features include two airtight wood burning stoves in home; Energy Star appliances; water saver plumbing fixtures; low-E windows; attic and basement insulation (partially funded by a Green Homes grant).

4. Middletown, MD (address available in booklet)
ABOUT THE HOME: This 1979 raised rancher was built using passive solar features, including the orientation of the house, adding extra insulation, insulating the perimeter of the foundation, adding windows and extending the overhang on the South side of the home. In 2009 we added a geothermal system, extra insulation to the attic and completed an energy audit. In 2011, we entered into a 20-year lease on a 7.6 kW rooftop solar PV system that provides most of our electricity requirements. The remaining electricity is provided from purchased wind power. The homeowner is the MD tour organizer. Stop by and chat about what you’d like to see on the tour.

5. Frederick, MD (address available in booklet)
ABOUT THE HOME: Our home is located on just shy of one acre of land in Frederick, MD. In November 2013, we installed a leased system of 50 solar panels located on the southern exposure of the roof. We installed a geo-thermal system when we built the home in 2003. The home is
all electric including the hot water heater. We have 50 trees planted in the back yard as part of the Neighborhood Green program.

6. Burkittsville, MD (address available in booklet)
ABOUT THE HOME: This 1850’s Federalist style brick home demonstrates that energy savings are possible even in older homes where it is not always feasible to add wall insulation or the recommended amount of
attic insulation. Energy Star appliance replacements, less than $1,200 in basement and attic insulation , and significant behavior changes resulted in an annual 42% reduction in energy use compared to their 2005 baseline and that was before window replacement. In 2012, a 3.8 kW leased solar PV system was added to the roof; the array provides 20-30% of electricity needs and additional electricity is purchased wind power. The home’s hot water heater is connected to a Mosaic Power unit which intelligently regulates electricity flow to the unit based on power grid fluctuations. Other green features include native tree plantings, rain barrels, and composting.

7. Knoxville, MD (address available in booklet)
ABOUT THE HOME: The original house is a 200 year old stone farm house. In 2007 we added an addition of approximately 2500 sq ft. The geothermal system provides heat and cooling for the addition. We have also installed a 15kW solar PV system.

8. Jefferson, MD (address available in booklet)
ABOUT THE HOME: Listed on the National Registry of Historic Sites, this 1810 griss- mill was built with an open full south wall. Renovation began in 1978. The owners received a grant from the Carter Administration to try an innovative Trombe wall and hoped to cut oil consumption by 50 percent in the 5500 sq. ft. building. Recently added a 19.52 kW solar PV array to become energy net-zero. Part of the 1978 renovation was Maryland’s first Nutricyclesystem, a combination of composting toilets and Graywater, that allows human nutrients to be recycled to on-site landscaping. Demonstrated are 3 composting toilet installations and three designs of graywater distribution that feed plants and grasses for nutrient absorption. In use are various rainwater collection stations, a heat-pump hot water unit, and retrofitted historic double hung windows. The Lewis Mill is the home of Catoctin Pottery (open also) and part of a building complex that represents life in the early 1800’s.

9. Jefferson, MD (address available in booklet)
ABOUT THE HOME: Built in the early 1990ís, this single family home was upgraded with a 6.845 kW grid-tied solar array in late 2010. During the summer of 2013 an expansion of the solar system increased the size of the solar array to a 15.1 kW system. Both systems use Enphase microinverters and feature web-based monitoring. In 2012 a Geothermal system was added to provide heating and cooling. Additional items to be displayed include web-based monitoring of the solar system, home electricity monitoring, Watersense lowflow toilets, a Nissan Leaf electric car, and a Cub Cadet RZT-S Zero all electric garden tractor. Discussion will include any or all of the following: How the technology works, What we’ve installed and why, Detailed data on costs and system performance.

10. Dickerson, MD (address available in booklet)
ABOUT THE HOME: Potomac Wind Energy Headquarters was established in 2006. It has been responsible for the first modern residential and farm turbines installed in Frederick, Carroll, Howard, Charles, Washington and Montgomery Counties in Maryland as well as at the National Botanical Gardens in Washington, DC. At present there are 10 turbines at our farm ranging from 200W to 20 kW. With the larger turbines, the return on investment can be as short as 7-years based on current MEA grants up to $20,000, the 30% Federal Tax Credit and current utility rates, for every cent increase in utility rates the payback time is reduced by approximately 9 months. A 20.7kW photovoltaic system was installed early in 2011. A 6kw ground mount PV and a Solar Power Shed.

11. Urbana, MD (address available in booklet)
ABOUT THE HOME: Mountainside is a non-profit created to promote environmental stewardship. Mountainside is home to a 10kW solar array and a 10kW wind turbine. Mountainside has rain gardens, composting toilets, organic gardens, 4000 tree riparian buffer, and a wetlands conservation area. Mountainside is also a 115-acre working farm with fields of corn and fruit trees.

12. Mount Airy, MD (address available in booklet)
ABOUT THE HOME: Linganore Winecellars was a 2011 winner of the Baltimore Business Journal 2011 “Green Business” award (small/medium sized businesses) for its many environmental sustainability investments. In 2011 they were also a grantee of two electric vehicle charging stations, and, in support of their long-term goal of being a “Net Zero” winery, were awarded a USDA Rural Energy for America Grant to help offset the cost of their 5.17 kW Solar PV Panels with the SunTracker system. They have also invested in “Air Krete “ a VERY green insulation.

13. Mt Airy, MD (address available in booklet)
ABOUT THE HOME: The Black Ankle Vineyards Tasting Room is passive solar with a solar hot water system. It is straw bale construction with a green roof, and 90% of the materials (wood, stone, straw, etc.) are from our farm. The entire farm is powered by a 76kW solar PV system on the roof of the straw bale winery barrel room. Our wine is of course solar powered as well.

14. Union Bridge, MD (address available in booklet)
ABOUT THE HOME: We have a 7.2kW (32 panels) dual tracker 2-pole mount PV system which is grid-tied. The house has a programmable 6 zone-18 SEER HVAC system with oil backup. All appliances are Energy Star rated including a front-loading washer and dryer. Windows are high efficient low E. We also own a Prius Hybrid.

15. Ellicott City, MD (address available in booklet)
ABOUT THE HOME: This 1950s ranch house has solar PV, solar hot water, a cupola/solar chimney, solar daylight tubes, solar attic fan, solar sidewalk lights, south facing energy efficient windows, 2 minisplit heat pumps (26-SEER), a fireplace insert wood stove, exterior insulation finishing system (EIFS), CFL/ LED lighting, recycled glass kitchen counter tops, and recycled floor tiles. 2 rain gardens, the start of a food forest, 2 rain barrels, 2 compost piles, and an aquaponics system in the basement.

16. Ellicott City, MD (address available in booklet)
ABOUT THE HOME: 20 solar panels total. Geothermal heat pump for heating and cooling. Replacement high efficient windows. Recent Energy Audit showed an air exchange rate of .35. Just .02 above an Energy Star Rating. All outdoor equipment is electric such as lawn mower, snow blower, weed trimmer, chain saw, etc.

17. Columbia, MD (address available in booklet)
ABOUT THE HOME: First Presbyterian Church of Howard County is situated on a six acre, wooded lot a short distance from downtown Columbia. Its campus includes several sustainable landscape features that conserve water and energy, incorporate native plants, reducing storm water
run off from downspouts and a large parking lot, and provide habitat for wildlife, increase urban tree canopy and provide an attractive and restful landscape. Composting, Recycled building materials, High efficiency windows, Energy efficient appliances, High efficiency lighting, Low water consumption, Rain garden. Conservation landscape garden. Dry creek River Bed to reduce storm water runoff. Large, 6 ft deep cistern for storm water runoff from most of the roof. Large gardens with several native plants. Green roof over entry way. Recycling facilities. Reusable mugs for hot beverages. Programmable thermostats.

18. Ellicott City, MD (address available in booklet)
ABOUT THE HOME: Some green features of our house include a 4,000 watt PV solar panel array, solar hot water panels, rain barrels and a 3-compartment compost bin. Additionally we installed a 2,700 sq ft vegetable and flower garden with a greenhouse.

19. Laurel, MD (address available in booklet)
ABOUT THE HOME: Owner has driven electric vehicles since 1999. Current ride is a Tesla Model S. A south facing roof is almost completely covered with a 6.4 KW solar system installed by Astrum Solar with Microinverters. Owner also doubled home supply dropline to 400 amp, and had a generator switchover panel installed. USA Insulation has injected the walls with expanding foam insulation, then returned the following year to blow in more.

20. Laurel, MD (address available in booklet)
ABOUT THE HOME: My roof’s PV was installed in April 2012 and provides about two-thirds of the electricity. And on some days, producing more then we use. Home features energy saving washing machine, CFL lighting and super insulation in the attic. Other alt fuel features include
Prius, electric car and an electric RoboMower.

21. Burtonsville, MD (address available in booklet)
ABOUT THE HOME: Owner designed and built. Passive solar geothermal, earth sheltered, low pollution building materials, 12 T rebar recycled from cars, active evacuated tube solar hot water, wood stove backup heat, 722 tons thermal mass, electric car, greenhouse, no surface water discharge from site.

22. Glen Burnie, MD (address available in booklet)
ABOUT THE HOME: My house has 40 Westinghouse Solar Panels on my house. Prior to adding solar we did a complete exterior remodel that included adding an inch and a half of blue board foam insulation to all exterior walls, and an double roof to add an inch and a half airspace between the original and new roof sheathing. This was to allow airflow from the soffit venting to the roof venting. The previous owner had blown in insulation added to the house that blocked all airflow in the attic.

23. Upper Marlboro, MD (address available in booklet)
ABOUT THE HOME: Original 1920s gable frame house was gutted and retrofit with strawbales. A timberframe addition was added to one end of the house and infilled with strawbales for insulation. A small loadbearing strawbale guesthouse was built by Builders Without Borders using lime and earth plasters and as featured outside the Capital building for almost a year. A small studio using a modified infill system was built and finished in local clay plasters. A variety of strawbale and plastering techniques were used in the structures from low to high-end. Boards, timbers and posts were obtained locally and milled using our sawmill or chainsaw. Lots of experiments in local reused materials, and timbers, trees, and found objects. Key themes are local natural materials, do it your self, low cost, and non-manufactured.

24. Harwood, MD (address available in booklet)
ABOUT THE HOME: This home, completed in 2011, is off-grid with a 10 kW photovoltaic system. Heating is by a bank of 9 flat plate panel solar thermal collectors and radiant floor system. On cloudy days, this is supplemented by a two-ton geothermal heat pump, and in the worst weather, a Navien tankless water heater, all through automated optimizing controls. Cooling is accomplished through a unique geothermal in-floor radiant cooling system aided by 2 air handlers. The home is of timber frame and SIP panel construction with R-44 walls, passive solar engineering, an insulated precast foundation, and Serious/Alpen quad pane windows. While the home is off-the-grid, it has all of the comforts of a typical home with washer, dryer, dishwasher, etc. A plug-in electric hybrid vehicle charging station was installed in 2012– available to visitors on sunny days.

25. Shady Side, MD (address available in booklet)
ABOUT THE HOME: This Shady Side home built in 1993 is an ongoing experiment in living lightly or sustainably on the earth. The main features of the house are lots of insulation, low emissivity windows, a wood pellet stove, a solar cooker, nesting osprey, passive solar heating and cooling, photovoltaic power, a wood cooking stove and lots of fans instead of ducts to circulate heat. The treed living room, located on the waterside of the house, is a passive heated solar sunspace that is used as a heat source for the rest of the house. More important than these parts is the way these parts are integrated into a whole, the management practices which make it all work to create significant energy savings and the lessons learned which were carried on to my work on Passive House and Net Zero Energy designs. For more information go to Sansone
Solar House on solarvillages.org.

sunday

A. Myersville, MD (address available in booklet)
ABOUT THE HOME: This is a 3,300 square foot Net Zero Home, which means it produces as much energy than it uses. This home has a 10.5 kilowatt PV solar system with battery backup along with 4-(30 tube) solar thermal panels. With the energy efficiency upgrades they were able to reduce their energy consumption to Net Zero. Homeowners are currently Green Home Ambassadors for the Frederick County Green Home Challenge Program. They have their Power Saver, Green Leader and Renewable Star certification.

B. Myersville, MD (address available in booklet)
ABOUT THE HOME: We have five bedroom 3,000 sq/ft home with a 9.0 kW solar PV system that we expect to cover 80% of our electricity usage. Additionally we installed a thermal hot water system that should reduce our usage even more.

C. Frederick, MD (address available in booklet)
ABOUT THE HOME: House is located in historic neighborhood dating to 1905. Solar PV panels are installed on south-facing garage roof.

D. Frederick, MD (address available in booklet)
ABOUT THE HOME: This home is currently under construction. The circular house is round wood framed using poplar, cherry and locust from the land. The walls are strawbale infill with earthen plasters on the interior and lime plaster on the exterior. The two roof lines are living roof design for drought tolerant plantings of sedums. Some features of our home: rubble trench foundation, round wood timber frame from our woods (75% storm fallen). On site sawmill for roof decking etc. Approx. 1,300’ sq with loft. Strawbale infill. Lime plaster on exterior, earthen plaster and floor in interior. Hand crafted sunken tub. Soap stone style stove as main heat. Living roof. Passive cooling. Many recycled windows, doors, and insulation. R value upwards of 40.

E. Middletown, MD (address available in booklet)
ABOUT THE HOME: Catoctin Creek Nature Center of the Division of Parks and Recreation for Frederick County opened on February 17th, 2001. The park is 139 acres filled with fields and meadows, forested areas and is named after Catoctin Creek which flows throughout. Visitors are invited to explore the exhibits and live animals in the discovery room to get up close and personal, and highlights green minded features which include a green roof, geothermal heating and cooling, and southwardly facing to utilize the sun for naturally lighting the nature center.

F. Jefferson, MD (address available in booklet)
ABOUT THE HOME: Built in the early 1990ís, this single family home was upgraded with a 6.845 kW grid-tied solar array in late 2010. During the summer of 2013 an expansion of the solar system increased the size of the solar array to a 15.1 kW system. Both systems use Enphase microinverters and feature web-based monitoring. In 2012 a Geothermal system was added to provide heating and cooling. Additional items to be displayed include web-based monitoring of the solar system, home electricity monitoring, Watersense lowflow toilets, a Nissan Leaf electric car, and a Cub Cadet RZT-S Zero all electric garden tractor. Discussion will include any or all of the following: How the technology works, What we’ve installed and why, Detailed data on costs and system performance.

G. Lovettsville, VA (address available in booklet)
ABOUT THE HOME: Now in our ninth year after going solar, we have a pretty good feel for how things work. Before adding 4 kW of ground-mounted solar and making various efficiency improvements the electricity usage in our small home was about 1000 kwh per month. Now it is about 300 kwh per month averaged over the year, which works out to a monthly bill of approximately $40.

H. Dickerson, MD (address available in booklet)
ABOUT THE HOME: Potomac Wind Energy Headquarters was established in 2006. It has been responsible for the first modern residential and farm turbines installed in Frederick, Carroll, Howard, Charles, Washington and Montgomery Counties in Maryland as well as at the National Botanical Gardens in Washington, DC. At present there are 10 turbines at our farm ranging from 200W to 20 kW. With the larger turbines, the return on investment can be as short as 7-years based on current MEA grants up to $20,000, the 30% Federal Tax Credit and current utility rates, for every cent increase in utility rates the payback time is reduced by approximately 9 months. A 20.7kW photovoltaic system was installed early in 2011. A 6kw ground mount PV and a Solar Power Shed.

I. Thurmont, MD (address available in booklet)
ABOUT THE HOME: Our 1750 sq ft. home was built 1992. We have a 17.6 kW, grid tied, ground mounted solar PV system. We use a Ted Monitoring system for complete power monitoring. Waste vegetable oil augmented diesel tractors and generator. Induction hotplates for canning and cooking. Soaker hoses for watering our organic garden with automatic water timers.

J. Thurmont, MD (address available in booklet)
ABOUT THE HOME: This home was built in 1954 and thoroughly renovated in 2009. The three-bedroom house sits on 1/3 of an acre within walking and bicycling distance to public amenities. Salvaged building materials from the home were reused. Roof-mounted solar collectors heat domestic water and radiant floor system (both slab and staple up systems).

K. Thurmont, MD (address available in booklet)
ABOUT THE HOME: An older Victorian style home that has been updated by: Replacing the ancient oil furnace with Geothermal heat pump including a desuperheater unit to supplement hot water heating. Unit uses two 320í+ vertical wells; Adding closed cell foam insulation applied to the attic under roof area and extending to the soffit and wall plates to limit convection loss of living area heat, closed cell foam sealing the band between the sill plates and foundation, the roof area above the addition, and the crawl space below the addition; Installation of 35 260W solar panels on the main roof and tied into the local utility grid. A number of updates including Tyvek ô house wrap, vinyl siding, and double paned windows were performed by a previous owner.

L. Sabillasville, MD (address available in booklet)
ABOUT THE HOME: ZigBone Farm Retreat, set on a 100-acre farm in Marylandís Catoctin Mountains, is a work of art in progress. The property has seven buildings, some historic. One by one they are being renovated using straw bale, earth and lime plasters, historic brick made centuries ago on the farm, and large-timber frame construction from recycled and felled trees on the land. Much of the work is being done by volunteers in workshops led by the projectís architect, nationally renowned green building designer Sigi Koko. The large-timber framing and construction is being done by BD Woodworks. Not permitted by the state of Maryland to install an eco-friendly graywater system, the complex does feature a Bay-friendly, state-of-the-art drip/tank septic system. It will also feature a geothermal system, radiant heat flooring, and other green features.

M. Emmitsburg, MD (address available in booklet)
ABOUT THE HOME: Historic Farmhouse built in 1764. Edwardian barn built in 1896. Both home and barn have been fully renovated for modern living and farming. We are a Certified Organic meat producer. We raise sheep, goats, hogs, rabbits, chickens and some produce. All of our animals are raised outdoors, on pasture. We installed a geothermal system and a grid-tied 28 kW PV system that provides about 50% of the farm’s energy requirement, with remaining from purchased wind power.

N. Westminster, MD (address available in booklet)
ABOUT THE HOME: We installed a solar hotwater heating system this year. It is a drian back system which works great. Our family of 5 now has plenty of hot water generated by the sun. We are really proud to go green and save money to boot.

O. Mt Airy, MD (address available in booklet)
ABOUT THE HOME: The Black Ankle Vineyards Tasting Room is passive solar with a solar hot water system. It is straw bale construction with a green roof, and 90% of the materials (wood, stone, straw, etc.) are from our farm. The entire farm is powered by a 76kW solar PV system on the roof of the straw bale winery barrel room. Our wine is of course solar powered as well.

P. Mount Airy, MD (address available in booklet)
ABOUT THE HOME: Linganore Winecellars was a 2011 winner of the Baltimore Business Journal 2011 “Green Business” award (small/medium sized businesses) for its many environmental sustainability investments. In 2011 they were also a grantee of two electric vehicle charging stations, and, in support of their long-term goal of being a “Net Zero” winery, were awarded a USDA Rural Energy for America Grant to help offset the cost of their 5.17 kW Solar PV Panels with the SunTracker system. They have also invested in “Air Krete “ a VERY green insulation.

Q. Ellicott City, MD (address available in booklet)
ABOUT THE HOME: Some green features of our house include a 4,000 watt PV solar panel array, solar hot water panels, rain barrels and a 3-compartment compost bin. Additionally we installed a 2,700 sq ft vegetable and flower garden with a greenhouse.

R. Columbia, MD (address available in booklet)
ABOUT THE HOME: Green (really) lawn care. Dozens of native plants in conservation landscape. Wildlife friendly. Rain barrels. Improvements made from Home Energy Inspection. Wind energy supplied by Ethical Electric. Indoor Red Worm composting, in addition to outdoor composting.

S. Glen Burnie, MD (address available in booklet)
ABOUT THE HOME: My house has 40 Westinghouse Solar Panels on my house. Prior to adding solar we did a complete exterior remodel that included adding an inch and a half of blue board foam insulation to all exterior walls, and an double roof to add an inch and a half airspace between the original and new roof sheathing. This was to allow airflow from the soffit venting to the roof venting. The previous owner had blown in insulation added to the house that blocked all airflow in the attic.

T. Shady Side, MD (address available in booklet)
ABOUT THE HOME: This Shady Side home built in 1993 is an ongoing experiment in living lightly or sustainably on the earth. The main features of the house are lots of insulation, low emissivity windows, a wood pellet stove, a solar cooker, nesting osprey, passive solar heating and cooling, photovoltaic power, a wood cooking stove and lots of fans instead of ducts to circulate heat. The treed living room, located on the waterside of the house, is a passive heated solar sunspace that is used as a heat source for the rest of the house. More important than these parts is the way these parts are integrated into a whole, the management practices which make it all work to create significant energy savings and the lessons learned which were carried on to my work on Passive House and Net Zero Energy designs. For more information go to Sansone
Solar House on solarvillages.org.

U. Kingsville, MD (address available in booklet)
ABOUT THE HOME: This is a new home which is designed to optimize the warmth from the sun in the winter and and the coolness from the earth in the summer. It is built into a hillside – earth sheltered/earth bermed, and passive solar house with lots of environmentally friendly features such as a waterless urinal, solar well pump, root cellar, solar tube lights and air lock entry. We used recycled materials in a number of areas – granite counter top, some windows, kitchen cabinets. The house has Thermomass walls (similar to ICFs but insulation is in the middle of the wall), it is super insulated, plus the exterior has 1” of foam with reflective coating, a rain screen and fiber cement siding. Check out blog: blog.jenspan.com